Memory enhancement: the progress and our fears
by
Gerlai R.
Saegis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., 60 Stone Pine Road,
Suite 200, Half Moon Bay, CA 94019, USA.
robert@saegispharma.com
Genes Brain Behav. 2003 Aug; 2(4): 187-8; discussion 189-90


ABSTRACT

In a recent article Rose (2002) raises numerous crucial issues with regard to the research into and the use of cognition or memory enhancing agents. Although development of 'smart' drugs is in its infancy, his paper delineates some issues society may have to face when these drugs arrive. Questions about the development of such drugs may be interesting to several readers of Genes Brain and Behavior given the wealth of information expected to be gained on brain function from studies using genetic approaches including mutagenesis, transgenic techniques and genomics in general. Besides the scientific questions, several ethical issues may need to be addressed that are of interest to us all. Rose (2002) discusses some of these questions, but perhaps presents a too negative view on the problems, especially with regard to the present and future of memory research. This paper is intended to focus mainly on the scientific questions and argues that our fear of complex ethical problems should not make us throw the baby (i.e., our research and discoveries) out with the bath water.

S Rose
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